Author Topic: A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name  (Read 6985 times)

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Offline Koray

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A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name
« on: May 08, 2013, 12:56:48 PM »
i heard from my history teacher that Allah's name was known amongst the pagan arabs before islams  arrival and he was worshipped as the creator of all things supreme deity. i searched from wikipedia and the west is maintaining that idea too.

Brother Osama can you enlighten us about that issue?

Offline QuranSearchCom

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Re: A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2013, 01:01:13 PM »
i heard from my history teacher that Allah's name was known amongst the pagan arabs before islams  arrival and he was worshipped as the creator of all things supreme deity. i searched from wikipedia and the west is maintaining that idea too.

Brother Osama can you enlighten us about that issue?

As'salamu Alaikum dear brother Koray,

It doesn't matter what the pagans named their gods.  One thing that no polytheist trinitarian pagan can dispute is that ALLAH had always been the Supreme GOD Almighty of the ENTIRE MIDDLE EAST and all Arabic, Aramaic and Hebrew speakers even before Judaism was born!

Please visit:

http://www.answering-christianity.com/allah_not_elohim.htm (the "im" is a Hebrew majestic plural for GOD Almighty, and the "e" and "o" are deliberate LIES by the English translators, because both should be "a")

www.answering-christianity.com/allah.htm
http://www.answering-christianity.com/convert_christians.htm

Take care,
Osama Abdallah

Offline Tanveer

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Re: A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2013, 03:00:54 PM »
i heard from my history teacher that Allah's name was known amongst the pagan arabs before islams  arrival and he was worshipped as the creator of all things supreme deity. i searched from wikipedia and the west is maintaining that idea too.

Brother Osama can you enlighten us about that issue?
He was. Remember that Ibrahim PBUH built the kaabah so obviously the people then worshipped Allah. As we all know they then became polytheists but they still worshipped Allah albeit alongside other gods such as Hubal and his so called daughters.

Offline Koray

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Re: A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2013, 03:22:28 PM »
Thank you brother Osama.

Tanveer i should have remembered that but the university began to screw up my head very badly that i cannot think clearly.

By the way, do you guys understand that when i'm writing "Insallah" i mean if Allah is willing and when i put the prefix Hz. before our prophets name that im glorifying him ?

Offline Tanveer

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Re: A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2013, 03:36:19 PM »
Thank you brother Osama.

Tanveer i should have remembered that but the university began to screw up my head very badly that i cannot think clearly.

By the way, do you guys understand that when i'm writing "Insallah" i mean if Allah is willing and when i put the prefix Hz. before our prophets name that im glorifying him ?
Yeah i understand that you mean Allah is willing and as for Hz, i always thought it meant something like 'the beloved' or something like that but apparently it means 'great presence' so im not sure if that counts as glorifying him.

Offline Koray

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Re: A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2013, 06:54:35 AM »
i made a quick research and found that ''Hz.'' or ''Hazreti'' means he who is not affected by time and place, meaning those who can be anywhere - anytime. Something like that. i suppose in Turkey we are using a wrong prefix before our prohet Muhammed sallahu aleyhi ve sellem. But the word ''hazreti'' is arabic, so i leave the job of enlightening us to brother Osama insallah :-)

Offline QuranSearchCom

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Re: A Question Concerning The Origin Of Allah's Name
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2013, 09:13:59 AM »
i made a quick research and found that ''Hz.'' or ''Hazreti'' means he who is not affected by time and place, meaning those who can be anywhere - anytime. Something like that. i suppose in Turkey we are using a wrong prefix before our prohet Muhammed sallahu aleyhi ve sellem. But the word ''hazreti'' is arabic, so i leave the job of enlightening us to brother Osama insallah :-)

As'salamu Alaikum dear brother Koray, and dear brothers and sisters in Islam,

The z sound that many Muslim nations use is really a Daa or Dhaa sound.  For example, Dhul-Qarnayn is usually spelled and pronounced as Zhul Qarnayn, or something along this line.  Hazrat Abu Bakr is really the Arabic Hadarat Abu Bakr, for example.  It's just a different pronunciation of certain letters.  Like for example, many of the folks from India (Muslims and non) pronounce the "W" as "V", as in "Ve" instead of "We".

Hadarat (hazrat) is derived from the Arabic word, Hudoor, which means coming and/or attendance.  Hadara means came or attended.  However, in Arabic there is also an expression of respect.  The chief of a group, or a leader or Amir of a group is given an expression of respect.  This expression goes as something like this:

"We sat in the Hadarat of such and such person."

Hadarat here means Council that such and such person was the head of.  Hadarat here is a title of honor for the elder or the chief.  Similarly, in the Court of Law in the Arab world, the judge is usually addressed as: "Hadarat Al-Qaadi".  Qaadi in Arabic means judge, and "Al" is the English "the" article.  So Al-Qaadi means "the judge".  And when the judge is addressed, he is addressed as "Hadarat Al-Qaadi", which is basically addressing him as the Chief of the Counsil or Sitting that is taking place.

So Hadarat Caliph Abu Bakr, or Hadarat Caliph Omar, or Uthman or Ali are titles of respect.  They don't mean that they are currently attending anything.  Also, Hadarat is only a title of respect that the slang Arabic uses.  In classical Arabic, they're not addressed as such.  In other words, it is not common for you to find an Arab saying Hadarat Khaleefa Abu Bakr.  Hadarat is rarely used by Arabic-speakers, and it by no shape or form means that a person is currently present.  May be the deviant shias have some inventions that they made, but we don't believe any dead person is present and giving inspirations.  And Allah Almighty made this clear in the Glorious Quran about the Martyrs and Pious people are in Heaven with GOD Almighty after death.

Please visit: http://www.answering-christianity.com/blog/index.php/topic,650.msg1523.html#msg1523.

I hope this helps, insha'Allah.

Take care,
Osama Abdallah