Author Topic: Does the Mafia act like Islam  (Read 2474 times)

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Offline Introvert98

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Does the Mafia act like Islam
« on: July 19, 2016, 01:13:48 AM »
Etymology - "Mafia"
Like the varied influences foreigners established in Sicily, there are many different influences in the creation of the word 'mafia'. Over time its meaning has been changed by Sicilians and Sicily's conquerors.

The word 'Mafia' was first mentioned in literature was published in a list of heretics in 1668. It followed the name of a witch, and meant 'boldness', 'ambition', and 'arrogance'. None of these qualities were considered proper for a woman, and thus the word 'mafia' took on its first negative connotation. (Hess)

Many people also believe that Arabic affected the word 'mafia' during the period of Arab control of Sicily, after the fall of the Roman Empire in 846 AD. 'Mahias' is an Arab word meaning 'bold man', and this is believed to be incorporated into the modern term mafia, which also implies the bold and aggressive nature of its constituents. (Hess)

Characteristics of the mafia were influenced by many other groups who conquered Sicily (Please see History for more information), but the word remained more or less unaltered from the 1668 document, until 1861, and the Unification of Italy. Garibaldi, an important pro-Italian general, set off to Sicily to unify it with the mainland. When the Sacaren Tribe of Palermo heard of the impending invasion they set off to a set of caves in the Marsala region of Sicily. This set of caves was known as the 'mafie', and the Sacaren used the caves to hide from Garibaldi and his troops. Garibaldi proceeded to name the people hiding in the caves 'mafiosi'. (Hess)

By 1862, only a year after Garibaldi coined the term 'mafiosi', a play entitled 'I Mafiosi della Vicaria' emerged as very popular in Sicily, as well as on mainland Italy. The play centered on a group of men who were imprisoned, and their interactions with each other while in jail. The men portrayed are not delinquent criminals, but rather they are men who plan crimes, and use their powerful prowess to influence the actions of others. This type of organized crime was named, by the play, 'Mafia'. Due to the play's popularity, this concept of organized crime proliferated across Italy, and soon Europe. (Hess)

In 1865 the police were using the term 'mafia', especially the phrase 'delitto de Mafia' to describe a man who plans crimes and pays others to carry them out. Foreign reporters began to pick up on this, and reported on the 'mafia' or secret societies in Sicily and Italy. (Hess)

Knowledge of the mafia grew in America in the early 20th century when immigration from Italy was at its highest ever. Members of the Mafia came to America and continued their fear and power based crime business. Only then did reports of Mafia crime begin to be published in America, and the concept of the mafia became significantly better known. With the release of The Godfather in 1972, the term 'mafia' became very widespread in secular life across the world, and especially in America. A new fascination had begun, but its history goes back nearly 2200 years.

 

Offline Introvert98

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Re: Does the Mafia act like Islam
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2016, 01:15:20 AM »
They main points are jizaya the mafia tazes people and men being over women, some even say that Islam kills people who leave the religion, the Nadia does this, are these arab ideals or Islamic ideals

Offline AhmadFarooq

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Re: Does the Mafia act like Islam
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2016, 02:17:16 AM »
Regarding Jizaya, by the same argument every state in the world acts like a "Mafia". If you do not pay money to the state, it jails you. In other words, you are safe or have freedom as long as you continue to pay.

I do not know if this was a common practice or not, but from what I've read, early Muslim Caliphs even used to pay back the money if they were unable to protect the minorities which is not something modern states practice. Additionally, modern states "forcefully" take money from the minorities and at the same time also expect them to join the army, protect the country and if need be give their lives too.

Regarding, men being over women, this is something that over centuries gradually started happening and taking root, so much so that in today's Muslim societies the practices have become so culturally ingrained that it will take some time to get rid of. For example, it took about 5 centuries for the prohibition on women from attending congregational prayers to became absolute. This in-spite of the presence of clear Prophetic narrations prohibiting Muslim men from making exactly such restrictions. After a thousand years, the average Muslim doesn't even know that women and men both used to attend congregation prayers in the first Muslim society.

Regarding, "Islam kills people who leave the religion" whether Muslims of today like it or not, this is something a lot of classical Muslim scholars have believed in. It doesn't have any proof from the Qur'an and in-fact it appears to even contradict this but some narrations of the Prophet have been interpreted in such a manner.

Offline Saudi Salafi

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Re: Does the Mafia act like Islam
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2016, 05:09:31 PM »
Regarding Jizaya, by the same argument every state in the world acts like a "Mafia". If you do not pay money to the state, it jails you. In other words, you are safe or have freedom as long as you continue to pay.

I do not know if this was a common practice or not, but from what I've read, early Muslim Caliphs even used to pay back the money if they were unable to protect the minorities which is not something modern states practice. Additionally, modern states "forcefully" take money from the minorities and at the same time also expect them to join the army, protect the country and if need be give their lives too.

Regarding, men being over women, this is something that over centuries gradually started happening and taking root, so much so that in today's Muslim societies the practices have become so culturally ingrained that it will take some time to get rid of. For example, it took about 5 centuries for the prohibition on women from attending congregational prayers to became absolute. This in-spite of the presence of clear Prophetic narrations prohibiting Muslim men from making exactly such restrictions. After a thousand years, the average Muslim doesn't even know that women and men both used to attend congregation prayers in the first Muslim society.

Regarding, "Islam kills people who leave the religion" whether Muslims of today like it or not, this is something a lot of classical Muslim scholars have believed in. It doesn't have any proof from the Qur'an and in-fact it appears to even contradict this but some narrations of the Prophet have been interpreted in such a manner.


Assalamu alaikum brothers,

 First, the Jizyah point has been dealt with too many times. I don't even feel like posting the links for them.

You can find them over her if you want:

Searching-islam.com

The killing of apostates is a law in Islam and I justify it. Read these following links:


http://www.letmeturnthetables.com/2012/05/punishment-apostasy-islam-rationale.html?m=1

Offline AhmadFarooq

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Re: Does the Mafia act like Islam
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2016, 08:09:43 PM »
Regarding Apostasy,

I don't know much about this topic, so I'm willing to learn. What about the narration in which the Prophet forgave an apostate.

Quote
Narrated Sa'd ibn AbuWaqqas:
On the day of the conquest of Mecca, Abdullah ibn Sa'd ibn AbuSarh hid himself with Uthman ibn Affan.
He brought him and made him stand before the Prophet (ﷺ), and said: Accept the allegiance of Abdullah, Messenger of Allah! He raised his head and looked at him three times, refusing him each time, but accepted his allegiance after the third time.
Then turning to his companions, he said: Was not there a wise man among you who would stand up to him when he saw that I had withheld my hand from accepting his allegiance, and kill him?
They said: We did not know what you had in your heart, Messenger of Allah! Why did you not give us a signal with your eye?
He said: It is not advisable for a Prophet to play deceptive tricks with the eyes.

Sunan Abi Dawud 4359, Grade : Sahih (Al-Albani)

And what is the evidence from Qur'an or Hadith which mention that a person who was born in a Muslim family and did not convert to Islam, when such a person adopts a religion different to Islam he should also be killed.

The article you linked to, in my humble opinion has some issues. It talks about a lot of things with little evidence from the original sources of Islam and more from the commentaries of Muslim scholars. From what I know, there have been differing interpretations, while some scholars do hold the ideas that the author quotes, others do not.
The quotation attributed to Al-Tabari does not justify the conclusion that the author makes, i.e. 'And to “command the good” and “forbid the wrong” primarily refers to belief and disbelief respectively.'

Offline Awesome31310

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Re: Does the Mafia act like Islam
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2016, 08:44:12 AM »
The biggest mafia to date has been the Catholic Church, raping the indigenous and pagan tribes throughout the world, promoting their false ideologies, shoving their b.s down the throats of our ancestors. But, that's the only way it could have sustained itself.

 

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