Author Topic: Mashal khan  (Read 4233 times)

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Offline Mohamed Saif

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Re: Mashal khan
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2017, 07:09:30 AM »
Assalamun alaikum dear brothers

You all are not alone. I'm also facing the same pain. He in Sri Lanka majority of the Buddhist monks give hate speeches here. They do not like Muslims. They are trying to ban halal food and stuff. So what we can do is only to pray and ask dua.

Offline Syedsamad

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Re: Mashal khan
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2017, 09:01:28 AM »
Yeah bro we need to be united at all cost BTW what is the population of Muslims in srilanka by percentage ?

Offline Mohamed Saif

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Re: Mashal khan
« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2017, 12:49:20 PM »
about 9.7% brother

Offline AhmadFarooq

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Re: Mashal khan
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2017, 02:28:54 AM »
- "We Muslims just get carried away by emotions that is why there are some people in .mY native village who support ISIS ... Muslims have not yet reformed and they desperately need to !!!"

From a sociological point of view, one of the most significant issues that has restricted Muslim progress in the past one century has been the non-acceptance of the wrongs done to them by Western powers. As long as, an honest understanding and recognition of past resentment has not been made, effected societies are unable to move forward. Societies continue to exist in a mess of contradiction. There is one, usually disenfranchised, group that cannot get over the injustice and decide to do something. The usual method of obtaining their version of "justice" happens to involve violent means. The other group, usually having access to more opportunities and education find it easier to either ignore those injustices or see better more peaceful ways of obtaining justice. In addition, this group for a variety of reasons restricts the workings of the violent group. These two contradictory views in the same society lead to an inevitable violent confrontation, which harms no other people more than the society itself.

Apparently, a partial reason (from a sociological point of view) of why "Muslim" extremists end up fighting so fervently with other Muslims from their own societies instead of the root of their anger i.e. Western powers.

On one hand, I completely accept the right of Muslims to their anger and frustration. It is one thing to have your people's children blown away by foreign powers; but the fact of utter callousness and unregretful attitude to these innocent deaths and the continued audacity to keep the status quo (such as the unashamed American support to Israel), are what make the situation much worse.
But on the other hand, Muslims should understand one of the lessons from God’s holy books. When the Jews were humiliated, taken slaves by the Babylonian king and became the target of much hardship, God instead of criticising their captors criticised the Jews themselves. That they broke the covenant, that their misfortune was the fault of their own hands etc. Whatever the external circumstances might be, at the end of the day, the fault and the burden of responsibility lies squarely on the shoulder of Muslims, themselves and no one else.

- “Is for the Fact that [Khyber] area is incredibly dangerous, most people cannot travel that area without a gun or protection from the local  groups that control that area.”

While this is what most foreigners are likely to believe, it is not very accurate. Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) is one of the four provinces of Pakistan. In the North-West, it used to have a very porous border with Afghanistan. Insurgents often used to travel between the two countries from these areas and because of mountainous terrain those crossings are difficult to control. The insurgents, especially belonging to TTP who precede Daesh but parallel its ideologies, were the primary source of the lawlessness. Things have settled down to quite an extent now, due to a large-scale military operation there.

- “Many people from there are very extreme in religion.”

Many people from all over Pakistan are pretty “extreme in religion”. While KP people are likely to be stricter in their following of religious tenets, they are not especially extremist, and even if they were, KP has suffered more than any other Pakistani province from the extremist insurgency. They have suffered enough loss of life from insurgent activities to have changed their minds.

- “Also i heard that after the muslim brotherhood defeated the soviets they settled in the area of kyber.”

Many different Muslim groups fought against the Soviets in Afghanistan. After the war, a lot of them went back while some stayed but mostly in Afghanistan.

- “Pakistan has great difficulty putting that area under it's laws.”

The main problematic areas were places called Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). These areas although in the same location are technically and officially not part of Khyber. These places, until the arrival of TTP in the area, used to be run by local people. Because of the centuries-old local laws, customs and traditions of the tribal areas, Pakistan governments had until recently never really tried to control them. After the military operation is over, those places are likely to go back under the governance of the local people.

- “This also explains why there was no quick police response. Also i am quite surprised that there even is a University in Kyber to begin with.”

These events develop very quickly, Usually, no one has any idea how dangerous is the situation, until it is too late. Apparently, although the Police were able to save one other blasphemy accused person, they were faced by a mob of “thousands”; there wasn’t much the Police could have done.

The university is located at a different location from those troubled areas. KP is an entire province, most of it is peaceful. And there are many, many universities in that province. Among all the events of blasphemy that I can recall, this is the only one which happened in this province. More of such events have occurred in Punjab province which is the richest, most populous, and most developed area of the country. These unfortunate events appear to have a direct relationship with the population of the area, higher the population, higher the likelihood of such instantaneous mobs.

Offline Albarra

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Re: Mashal khan
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2017, 12:57:09 AM »
As-salaamu alaikum brothers,

Actually, the top Muslim cleric mufti  and Prime Minister condemned Mashal Khan's murder, saying that it's violated against Islamic Justice. Also, some investigators said that there is no evidence that he committed blasphemy.

Question: Why did mob murder Mashal Khan instead of taking to the Islamic court? I guess they don't follow Islamic law correctly.


Nevertheless, the Islamic police arrested dozens of suspects for killing Khan.


However, this incident is not very common because at least 65 people have been murdered after being acused of blasphemy since 1990!!! Yet this incident is unusual, but it doesn't happen everyday.

Peace,

Albarra (Riyadh, KSA)